Mark Zuckerberg

Mark Zuckberg is the Co-founder, CEO and Chairman of Facebook, the social networking site. He is listed as the 25th most powerful people in Forbes and the second youngest billionaire in Forbes 400. He holds a personal wealth estimated at $9.4 Billion as of 2012.

Tech firms and their founders: Monarchs versus managers

THE epic struggle between two billionaires over the future of Dell has gone to another round. Michael Dell, the ailing computer-maker’s founder and biggest shareholder, has now been forced twice to postpone a vote on his proposal to buy out the firm and take it off the stockmarket, for fear that the deal’s critics, led by Carl Icahn, a veteran shareholder activist, may have enough support to scupper the plan.

Source: www.economist.com | Date: 12th August 2013 Read more

Facebook share price jumps 20% with second-quarter profit report

Improved results show company is steadily increasing how much of its advertising revenue comes from mobileFacebook reported a second-quarter profit on Wednesday, exceeding analysts' expectations and providing the floundering stock with a much-needed surge in after-hours trading. The company's sales rose to $1.81bn, a 53% increase from the previous quarter. This figure was a slight increase from the $1.62bn analysts expected the company would make. Facebook stock has returned a mediocre performance since the company went public in May 2012, but on Wednesday shares jumped 20% to $31.81 during after-hours trading. Second-quarter results show that the company it is steadily increasing how much of its advertising revenue comes from mobile. The amount of total advertising revenue jumped from 30% in the first-quarter to 41% in the second, comprising $656m in sales. "We've made good progress growing our community, deepening engagement and delivering strong financial results, especially on mobile," Mark Zuckerberg, Facebook's founder, said in a statement. "The work we've done to make mobile the best Facebook experience is showing good results and provides us with a solid foundation for the future."The company reported a $562m profit and $333m net income, which is 13 cents a share. This time last year, the company reported a loss of $157m in the second quarter. The number of Facebook daily active users increased from 665 million in the first quarter to 669 million in the second. In June, the site had an average of 469 million daily users on mobile. Facebook had 819 million mobile monthly active users in second quarter of 2013, compared to 543 million in the second quarter of 2012. The new figures were also a boost from the 751 million reported last quarter. With adjustments for one-time events including related payroll tax expenses and income tax adjustments, Facebook said it earned 19 cents a share.FacebookTechnology sectorStock marketsInvestingSocial mediaUnited StatesAmanda Holpuchguardian.co.uk © 2013 Guardian News and Media Limited or its affiliated companies. All rights reserved. | Use of this content is subject to our Terms & Conditions | More Feeds    

Source: www.guardian.co.uk | Date: 25th July 2013 Read more

Facebook censors Pravda.Ru

In the afternoon of Friday, June 21st, hyperlinks to Pravda.Ru materials stopped to appear on the Pravda.Ru page on Facebook. We contacted the support team of Facebook, although to no avail: moderators of the Russian division of the US-based social network did not bother answering. On Sunday afternoon, access to the publication of links was opened

Source: english.pravda.ru | Date: 23rd July 2013 Read more

Winklevoss twins file plan for Bitcoin public offering

What could go wrong with the Winklevoss Bitcoin Trust? Plenty, according to the SEC filing.NEW YORK — In what is believed to be the first Bitcoin-related securities offering, the Winklevoss twins want to give investors a piece of the virtual currency, whose growing popularity has caught the eye of entrepreneurs and regulators alike.    

Source: articles.latimes.com | Date: 5th July 2013 Read more

Winklevoss twins file plan for Bitcoin public offering

What could go wrong with the Winklevoss Bitcoin Trust? Plenty, according to the SEC filing.NEW YORK — In what is believed to be the first Bitcoin-related securities offering, the Winklevoss twins want to give investors a piece of the virtual currency, whose growing popularity has caught the eye of entrepreneurs and regulators alike.    

Source: www.latimes.com | Date: 3rd July 2013 Read more

Tecnología - Chile, Regional - La privacidad murió y no va a volver, sostienen expertos

La privacidad está desapareciendo ya que cada vez más personas, particularmente las generaciones más jóvenes, están dispuestas a entregar detalles personales en redes sociales, mientras que hay cámaras en todos lados para captar los momentos cuando nos equivocamos, según expertos en medios sociales. En el marco del seminario Chile Digital que se realizó en Santiago el 19 de junio, Erik Qualman, autor del best-selling Socialnomics, reiteró las palabras del fundador y gerente general de Facebook, Mark Zuckerberg, al afirmar que si queremos aprovechar las redes sociales, tiene que haber un trueque y hay que renunciar a parte o gran parte de la privacidad. "En mi mente la privacidad está muerta y no creo que vuelva. No es algo que quiera, solo es algo que ocurrió. Cuando hablo con estudiantes adolescentes siempre les digo, cualquier cosa que hagan, asuman que va a estar en todos lados. Así que vivan como si su madre los estuviera mirando", dijo Qualman a BNamericas en el marco de la conferencia. "Lo que sea que pase en Las Vegas, llega a Youtube, Facebook y Twitter", añadió. Roberto Camhi, gerente general y fundador del portal chileno de mapas Mapcity, concordó con Qualman, y señaló, "creo que las generaciones nuevas no tienen consciencia de la privacidad y es un tema que no va a ser un tema en el futuro". Consultado si esto pudiera no causar problemas, Camhi indicó que siempre que existan leyes que establezcan parámetros y directrices para el uso de información, no debiera ser un problema. No obstante, señaló que el escándalo que involucra a la Agencia Nacional de seguridad de EE.UU. este mes podría hacer que algunas personas empiecen a cuestionarse y limitar cierta información que entregan. Gemma Muñoz, experta española en analítica web y escritora, indicó que la preocupación sobre la privacidad es más pronunciada en Europa que en EE.UU. Indicó que tienen que haber límites al tipo de información que se puede solicitar y que si los datos son utilizados en forma ética pueden beneficiar al consumidor. "Creo que bien utilizado este conocimiento de quién es el usuario como persona no para tu propio beneficio sino para dar un mejor servicio, al final el usuario te va a agradecer", indicó Muñoz, en el marco de Chile Digital. "Tienes que saber dónde parar. Nunca te pediré un número de identificación, un pasaporte, nunca te pediré un dato relevante", añadió.

Source: www.bnamericas.com | Date: 25th June 2013 Read more

Tesla to triple supercharger stations for coast-to-coast car trips

Chief executive Elon Musk says company will have the stations in most cities in the US and Canada by the end of the yearThe electric car maker Tesla plans to swiftly multiply its supercharger stations across the US so drivers can travel coast to coast without worrying about losing power.CEO Elon Musk said the company would triple the number of stations by June and expand again to have them in most cities in the US and Canada by the end of the year."It is very important to address this issue of long-distance travel," he said on Wednesday. "When people buy a car, they're also buying a sense of freedom, the ability to go anywhere they want and not feel fettered."Tesla has supercharger stations, which allow drivers to recharge in about an hour, on the east coast as well as California and Nevada. In between drivers must charge overnight using ordinary electric current, a serious limitation.Within two years Tesla plans to have almost the entire country, not just big cities, within range of a supercharger.Musk's announcement followed a spate of good news for Tesla – it is now profitable and earning rave reviews – as well as more problematic headlines about Musk's admiration for Margaret Thatcher and his withdrawal from a Mark Zuckerberg-backed political advocacy group.Musk, speaking at a question-and-answer session at the All Things Digital conference in Rancho Palos Verdes, California, said updates to Tesla cars will give drivers a map of charging stations.The ability to use superchargers is standard on high-range Tesla models and optional on cheaper models.In addition to spreading across the continental US the network will add more stations to heavily trafficked routes such as the corridor between New York, Boston and Washington DC, which will have a station every 80 to 100 miles.Musk said Tesla hoped to improve the technology so Model S cars could get three hours of driving time from just 20 minutes of charging. He plans to drive his five children in a Model S from Los Angeles to New York this summer.The billionaire, who also founded Space X and Solar City, clashed with the New York Times earlier this year when a reviewer, John Broder, said he ran out of power and was stranded while trying to drive from Washington to Boston using the supercharger network.Musk accused Broder of taking a detour to deliberately run out of power, triggering an acrimonious exchange. The paper's public editor concluded the reviewer took what appeared to be casual and imprecise notes, leaving him open to valid criticism, but acted in good faith.Musk revisited the row in his conference speech and alleged Broder committed a "low-grade ethics violation".The Model S has since won glowing reviews elsewhere. Tesla has become profitable and its share price topped $100 this week for the first time. Musk said economies of scale and technological refinements should let the company produce a car priced under $40,000 within a few years.He said he decided to make electric cars because sustainable transport was needed yet manufacturers shunned the idea. "The industry was operating under two false premises. One, that you could not create a compelling electric car. And two, that no one would buy it."Musk made headlines earlier this month by dropping out of fwd.us, a Zuckerberg-sponsored political action committee pressing for immigration reform. The group stirred uproar among liberals by supporting pro-immigration reform politicians who also backed oil drilling in Alaska and the Keystone XL pipeline."Initially, I agreed to be a part of FWD.us because I agree with immigration reform. But I think the methods that were employed - it was a little too Kissinger-esque, Realpolitik," said Musk. "We shouldn't give in to the politics. If we give in to that, we'll get the political system we deserve."An earlier, fleeting foray into politics in April stung the tycoon when he tweeted about Britain's late prime minister. "Always admired Margaret Thatcher. She was tough, but sensible & fair, much like my English nana."Indignation and trolling prompted him to step back. "No more political comments for me now that I've shot off both my feet."Electric, hybrid and low-emission carsAutomotive industryUnited StatesRory Carrollguardian.co.uk © 2013 Guardian News and Media Limited or its affiliated companies. All rights reserved. | Use of this content is subject to our Terms & Conditions | More Feeds    

Source: www.guardian.co.uk | Date: 31st May 2013 Read more

Facebook set to make small-screen debut on Android smartphone

Social network's collaboration with HTC expected to customise functions ranging from camera to home screenFacebook will take its biggest leap into mobile this evening when it is expected to unveil a collaboration with handset maker HTC and software that can take over any Android phone.At an event in its San Francisco headquarters, the world's largest social network will reveal how it intends to keep up with the computing habits of its 1 billion monthly users, 680 million of whom now access Facebook from a phone.The centrepiece will be Facebook Home, an application which can be downloaded to Android phones to customise an array of functions from the camera to the home screen, according to a leak of the software seen by the Android Police website.The software is likely to be illustrated on a device called Myst, specially made by Taiwanese firm HTC. The long-rumoured Facebook phone is the fruit of a two year development project whose early incarnation bore the codename 'Buffy' – presumably a reference to the vampire killer television series.Other than an invitation to "Come see our new home on Android", Facebook has given no clue as to the content of this evening's presentation, but the Guardian's west coast correspondent Rory Carroll will be reporting live from 1 Hacker Way, Menlo Park, when proceedings begin at 6pm GMT.Facebook's head of mobile Eric Tseng and other staff have been busy filing patents which hint at some of the big features that could appear. Chief among them is the 'uberfeed', according to technology news site Unwiredview, which will be visible from the locked home screen. It will gather information relevant to the owner not just from Facebook, but from emails, texts, news sources, location specific updates, and contain targeted advertising.Enhanced caller identification pages could also show details of the person on the other end of the line including their location, and prompts such as the names of their children, their last holiday or a recent cinema outing.The patent application, called "Caller identification using social networking information", would essentially allow Facebook to take over the owner's phone book and dialler. Tseng has even proposed ranking the hundreds of entries in the average smartphone contacts book according to 'social proximity', in otherword's how close they are to the user.Should all this feel too invasive, Facebook has patented a button or setting to switch sharing on and off. Leave it on, and everything you do from taking a train ride to photographing a friend's birthday is broadcast over the internet.The Myst handset will be more unique for its software, and the depth to which Facebook features such as its Instagram and instant messaging applications are integrated. The camera and memory are reportedly run of the mill, according to the anonymous Twitter user @LlabTooFeR, a source relied on by developers for unofficial updates on HTC's plans.The rear lens will have a modest 5 megapixel resolution rear lens for photos, the front facing camera 1.6 megapixels for video calls, and storage will be a basic 16GB. The screen is larger than the iPhone at 4.3 inches, and the handset will work on certain 4G networks.Whatever Facebook is planning, founder Mark Zuckerberg has made it clear that the smarpthone will be his focus in 2013."You have a good version of all the Facebook features you know and want on your phone. So now the next thing we're going to do is get really good at building new mobile-first experiences," he told investors in January. "That's going to be a big theme for us this year."Many of his customers now access Facebook only or mainly from a smartphone rather than a personal computer. In the last year, Facebook's monthly active users over mobile have rocketed 57%, and if the network is to keep their attention it must ensure rival services such as Google+ do not outpace it on the small screen.FacebookInternetSocial networkingTechnology sectorUnited StatesMobile phonesAndroidHTCSmartphonesJuliette Garsideguardian.co.uk © 2013 Guardian News and Media Limited or its affiliated companies. All rights reserved. | Use of this content is subject to our Terms & Conditions | More Feeds

Source: www.guardian.co.uk | Date: 4th April 2013 Read more